Art

Eddie Woods — in conversation with John Wisniewski

Posted on by urbangraffito Posted in Ephemera, Interview, Photography | Leave a comment

Eddie Woods

 

in conversation with John Wisniewski

 

Eddie Woods at the Beat Hotel (Paris, July 2009). Photo © by Lars Movin

Eddie Woods at the Beat Hotel (Paris, July 2009). Photo © by Lars Movin

JW: You had a variety of jobs over the years while getting on with your writing. Could you tell us about some of them, maybe a few that you enjoyed doing?

 

EW: I wholeheartedly agree with André Gide’s dictum, “All work that is not joyous is wretched.” And while the word ‘enjoy’ may not apply to my time in the Air Force, I still got a lot out of those four years, about which I’ll be writing in one of my future memoirs. It’s a given that I grooved on journalism. Some of that is covered in my most recent book, Tennessee Williams in Bangkok. And I am now encouraging Stanford University to obtain copies of all the pieces I wrote for the Bangkok Post so they can go into my archive there. We can forget the Tehran Journal (I was their sports and night editor in the mid-1970s), as that paper got buried after the 1979 Islamic revolution. I dug being a short-order cook and had the best teacher, namely my father! Programming first-generation IBM computers for two years was all right, until they started to bore me and I quit. Selling encyclopedias was a gas. Did that throughout the latter part of the Sixties, made good money, got to travel around Germany and France, then out to the Far East (where another life began for me). Managing a steakhouse in Hong Kong was cool. Ditto a few other gigs. It would never have crossed my mind to toil in a factory or on a farm. I’m a dunce when it comes to any kind of manual labor. All I’m good at with my hands are eating, writing, and sex.
Read more

Love for the Strings: The Art & Performance of Hikari Kesho’s Shibari Photography — a visual essay by Mark McCawley

Posted on by urbangraffito Posted in Art, Essay, Performance, Photography, Writing | Leave a comment

Love for the Strings:

 

The Art & Performance of Hikari Kesho’s Shibari Photography

 

a visual essay by Mark McCawley

 

Hikari Kesho has always had a passion for the photography of bodies, particularly the female form, exploring what he called “body expression” when at the age of 18 he began his first serious and continuing explorations of photography by enrolling in a major photo club. Often his photographic research led him to interpret the body with the use of chains, ropes, even ivy, anything that could be used to “lock” the position of the subject in a desired position, to transform the subject “more charming, more beautiful graphically, yet certainly also the most erotic” to the eye.
Read more

Gibberish, Hallucinations, Paranoia, and the Long Way Out of Town by Jose Padua

Posted on by josepadua Posted in Art, Daily, Essay, Jose Padua, Photography | Leave a comment

UG_LongWay

Gibberish, Hallucinations, Paranoia,

and the Long Way Out of Town

 

by Jose Padua

 

I can’t remember the quick way out of town anymore, and while we were stuck in traffic on North Capitol Street this morning, we saw this man standing at the entrance to this building, which is listed as the address of the Ida Mae Campbell Wellness & Resource Center. From behind the man looked like he was perhaps a businessman or even a doctor, but as we waited in traffic he remained at the door, and after a moment I could see that he was staring at a sign above the doorknob. When he turned around briefly, I could see he had a totally blank expression on his face, the look of someone who is far beyond just being lost. Then he turned back around to stare at the sign.
Read more

Poem by Jose Padua

Posted on by josepadua Posted in Art, Daily, Jose Padua, Photography, Poetry, Writing | 2 Comments

Poem

 

by Jose Padua

 

RehobothKohrCone_UG

POEM

Although I support
my sisters all over
the world in their
struggle for equality
and quest for empow-
erment, I must confess
that from time to time
when I say the word
“titties” it is not one
of my Tourette’s tics
but simply me, thinking
about breasts the way
a six year old thinks
about ice cream. Sorry.

-Jose Padua
Read more

In Homage to My Ancestors and Their Dirt by Jose Padua

Posted on by josepadua Posted in Daily, Jose Padua, Photography, Poetry, Writing | Leave a comment

In Homage to My Ancestors and Their Dirt

 

by Jose Padua

 

Ancestors_30per

In Homage to My Ancestors and Their Dirt

Because everyone else writes like
the past was one long fucking fairy
tale let me say that my ancestors
passed a lot of gas. If we saw them
at our door today we would stand up
for their rights but we would not let
them in the front door. Sorry, but that
ever present fart smell precludes their
entry. I love them and I respect them,
but I have enough difficulty breathing
as it is. They also don’t know when to
look away from you. For some reason
continuous eye contact was the norm
for them: what we now find unnerving
was for them a sign of respect, a sign
that they realized the influence of the
past upon the present and future is like
a trail of dust that bends through wind
and sky to meet us around the corner by
the cupcake shop. And daylight back
then wasn’t always shrouded in fog
or mist, and we didn’t all live near
the water, and if they could talk the
way we talk now they would, and they
would ask, as they look at the world
and what we’ve done with it, “What
the hell is all this shit, motherfucker?”
And, “You realize that while you’re
busy staring at that little black box
I could easily bash your head in.
Then I could eat your brains, and
thus gain possession of your power,
your knowledge, and your soul. Not
to mention that ugly blue box you call
a mini-van.” Ah, but if they don’t kill us
how we will drink, how we will feast,
how we will honor the past together
with each swallow of roasted pig,
pave the road to the future as we wet
our lips with room temperature whiskey.
Ah, how the days will go by, and how
the clouds will fly like white birds, and
turn to rain and turn to snow to cover us.

-Jose Padua

 

José PaduaJosé Padua’s poetry and fiction have appeared in Bomb, Salon.com, Exquisite Corpse, Another Chicago Magazine, Unbearables, Crimes of the Beats, Up is Up, but So Is Down: New York’s Downtown Literary Scene, 1974-1992, and many other journals and anthologies. He has also written features and reviews for NYPress, Washington City Paper, the Brooklyn Rail and the New York Times. He has read his work at the Lollapalooza Festival, CBGBs, the Knitting Factory, the Black Cat Club, the Public Theater, the Washington Project for the Arts, and many other venues. José also blogs at Shenandoah Breakdown with his life partner, poet Heather Davis, and at the blog, Kings of the Road, and for Salon.com. José Padua’s most recent collection of poetry is a chapbook, The Complete Failure of Everything (2008: The Apathy Press Poets, Baltimore).

Photograph by Jose Padua. Jose Padua is co-author of the blog Shenandoah Breakdown.