Visual Art

Marco Rea: Pop Surrealist Provocateur — in conversation with Mark McCawley

Posted on by urbangraffito Posted in Art, Ephemera, Interview, Visual Art | 1 Comment

Marco Rea: Pop Surrealist Provocateur

 

in conversation with

Mark McCawley

 

Born in Rome in 1975, where he still lives and works, Marco Rea graduated in History of Contemporary Art, producing for many years graffiti on the walls of several Italian cities as a graffiti artist. It was during this time that Rea created and developed his own unique ‘Pop Surrealist’ technique of spray painting on billboards and the pages of glossy magazines. The result being nothing less than provocative.

From Bulgari to Art by Marco Rea

From Bulgari to Art by Marco Rea

Take for instance, ‘From Bulgari to Art’, in which Rea’s technique transforms glossy magazine advertising into something entirely new, alive. Rea has raised the culture jamming ethos of Italy’s urban street artists — a form of subvertising used to disrupt or subvert media culture and its mainstream cultural institutions, including corporate advertising — into an entirely new realm of artist endeavour which focuses not only on subverting or critiquing political or advertising messages, or their negation, but to transcend both image and message with one of Rea’s own creation.
Read more

4 works from the "Looking for Mao" series by Andreas Maria Jacobs

Posted on by urbangraffito Posted in Art, Visual Art | Leave a comment

Andreas Maria Jacobs is an artist, writer and editor born in The Netherlands in 1956. Urbanity is a main motif for the transmedial art which he produces. AMJ defines “transmedial art as any art trying to escape the traditional boundaries normally applied to specific art fields such as painting, dance, performance and the like. For me the art genre I work in is best described by ‘painting’.”

AMJ confesses that inspiration for his work comes both from his own experiences and the world surrounding him:

“In the sense that the separation between ‘me’ and the ‘other’ is always a problematic one and I use my work as a means to investigate this problematic duality. Inspiring philosophers who influenced my works are among others Jacob Boehme (a Renaissance thinker and Shoemaker), Spinoza (Dutch Renaissance Freethinker), Vladimir Solovyov (Russian 19th century Mystic) and the whole bunch of modern philosophers ranging from Karl Marx and Oswald Spengler to Deleuze and Pierre Bourdieu.

I cannot make a distinction between my ‘head’ and my ‘life’, my ‘head’ is my ‘life’ and my ‘life’ is my ‘head’, so what’s in my head is also in my life and vice versa.”

My head is my life and my life is my head.’ ~ Interview with Suze Hupkes, Yeditepe University Instanbul / Hogeschool Utrecht

Read more